Margaret Smith

Colour portrait photograph of Margaret Smith, university teacher, scientific researcher and TAHG member at the University of Glasgow

Dr Margaret Smith

Lecturer/Research Associate

History of Art, University of Glasgow

Current Projects

Margaret’s main research expertise lies in the study of degradation rates of materials, the effects of environmental conditions on these rates and the interaction at materials’ surfaces in respect to molecular mechanisms of attachment and release. Such detailed understanding is crucial in the application of scientific research to cultural heritage study. Her expertise (HPLC, GC, FTIR, Raman and UV spectroscopy and microscopy) within the TAH group supports many of the MLitt research projects on painted cloths and paintings.

Her object research is focused on painted cloths and barkcloth. Margaret is also part of our research team on the PISTACHIO project researching non-invasive Photonic Imaging Strategies for Technical Art History and Conservation in collaboration with Heriot-Watt University and The Hunterian.

Biography

Margaret is a lecturer and research associate within the Centre for Textile Conservation and Technical Art History. She joined the Technical Art History group part-time in 2013 to develop the analytical teaching and also to contribute to the group’s research. Currently she works as both a lecturer and research associate across both the disciplines of Technical Art History and Textile Conservation.

Previously she was a research chemist for 23 years both in industry and in the Schools of Engineering and Chemistry at the University of Glasgow, where she gained extensive experience in the application of analytical techniques, materials science and coordinating field trials in multidisciplinary projects. In 2011-12 she became an intern funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund and the Institute of Conservation working jointly between academia and the heritage sector and this catalysed her interest in heritage science

Useful Links

For more details, please check out Margaret’s university homepage and ResearchGate profile.